Group for the Scientific Reappraisal of the HIV/AIDS Hypothesis

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The Group for the Scientific Reappraisal of the HIV/AIDS Hypothesis (aka the Group) [1] came into existence as a group of signatories of an open letter to the scientific community. The letter (dated 6 June 1991) has been submitted to the editors of Nature, Science, The Lancet and The New England Journal of Medicine:


"It is widely believed by the general public that a retrovirus called HIV causes the group diseases called AIDS. Many biochemical scientists now question this hypothesis. We propose that a thorough reappraisal of the existing evidence for and against this hypothesis be conducted by a suitable independent group. We further propose that critical epidemiological studies be devised and undertaken."


All have refused to publish it. In 1995 The Group was able to get a letter published in Science:


"In 1991, we, the Group for the Scientific Reappraisal of the HIV/AIDS Hypothesis, became dissatisfied with the state of the evidence that the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) did, in fact, cause AIDS.
Specifically, we have proposed that researchers independent of the HIV establishment should audit the Centers for Disease Control's records of AIDS cases, bearing in mind that the correlation of HIV with AIDS, upon which the case for HIV causation rests, is itself an artefact of the definition of AIDS. Since 1985, exactly the same diseases or conditions have been defined as 'AIDS' when antibodies are present, and as 'non-AIDS' when HIV and antibodies are absent. Independent professional groups such as the Society of Actuaries should be invited to nominate members for an independent commission to investigate the following question: How frequently do AIDS-defining diseases (or low T cell counts) occur in the absence of HIV? Until we have a definition of AIDS that is independent of HIV, the supposed correlation of HIV and AIDS is mere tautology.
Other independent researchers should examine the validity of the so-called 'AIDS tests', especially when these tests are used in Africa and Southern Asia, to see if they reliably record the presence of antibodies, let alone live and replicating virus.
The bottom line is this: the skeptics are eager to see the results of independent scientific testing. Those who uphold the HIV 'party line' have so far refused. We object."


Signed by:
for the Group for the Scientific Reappraisal of the HIV/AIDS Hypothesis. (Science, 17 Feb 1995, vol. 267 pp. 945-946)


The number of signatories to the original 1991 letter continues to grow. A list of these signatories is available at the following webpage: Current Signatories. (Signatories are indicated in blue or purple colour.) The majority of the more than 2,000 signatories listed have academic or medical credentials, and many have direct experience in AIDS research or in fields closely related to AIDS.

It is an interesting and instructive exercise to constrast the fate of the letter submitted by the Group in 1991 to that of the Durban Declaration, a document signed in support of the HIV/AIDS hypothesis in 2000.

External link